Spring 2017 Writing Workshops

Workshop 1: Reading Strategies to Support Student Learning

When: Tuesday, January 17th, 2:00 - 3:30pm, ILC 136  Register

Facilitators: Lindsay Hansen (Asst. Prof. of Practice) and Brad Jacobson (Writing Support Specialist)

Description: Academic reading poses unique challenges as students are expected to question, compare, and use new information while also working with discipline-specific vocabulary and writing styles (Wingate 2015). Especially when writing assignments emerge from course texts, these reading challenges can compound to create poor grades and a negative attitude about learning.

This interactive workshop introduces instructors to research-based strategies for helping students build their academic reading skills and engage more deeply with course texts. Workshop participants will engage in a number of reading-to-write exercises and discuss how incorporating these or similar exercises could work in their class to support a positive learning environment. Participants will leave with specific strategies for incorporating reading assignments in their classes.

Workshop Outcomes:

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to employ a variety of strategies to engage students with class texts and gauge student learning

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Workshop 2: Developing Rubrics for Fair, Consistent, Efficient Grading of Writing

When: Wednesday, February 1st, 10:00 - 11:30 am, ILC 136  Register

Facilitators: Lindsay Hansen (Asst. Prof. of Practice) and Brad Jacobson (Writing Support Specialist)

Description: Using effective grading rubrics for writing assignments is one way to facilitate student learning and make assessment more fair, consistent, and efficient (White and Wright, 2016). This workshop offers instructors an introduction to the practical considerations of using rubrics for assessing writing in general education and disciplinary courses. Participants will have an opportunity to discuss research-based practices for designing effective rubrics, analyze and evaluate sample rubrics, and begin to develop or revise a rubric for a writing assignment in their course.  

To maximize the benefit of this workshop, please bring a copy of an assignment you use for one of your courses.

Workshop Outcomes:

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. align rubric criteria with assignment goals and priorities
  2. evaluate rubric design to serve different purposes
  3. revise rubric criteria for clarity and purpose

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Workshop 3: Responding to Student Writing

When: Monday, February 13, 2:00 - 3:30 pm, ILC 136  Register

Facilitators: Lindsay Hansen (Asst. Prof. of Practice) and Brad Jacobson (Writing Support Specialist)

Description: Research on best teaching practices suggests that high-quality feedback from instructors is an important factor supporting students’ writing development. This workshop introduces general education instructors to a variety of resources and strategies to provide feedback on student writing that facilitates meaningful revision.

Participants will have the opportunity to critique actual student writing and discuss appropriate and effective feedback strategies for different stages of the writing process. The workshop will also address practical concerns, such as the challenges of large class sizes and balancing teaching demands. Participants will leave the workshop better prepared to give feedback on student writing and with increased awareness of their role in general education writing instruction.

Workshop Outcomes

By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. identify principles of providing effective feedback on student writing.
  2. employ a variety of strategies to provide useful feedback on student writing and encourage revision.

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Workshop 4: Designing Student Peer Review Activities

When: Thursday, March 2nd, 2:00 - 3:30  pm, ILC 136  Register

Facilitators: Lindsay Hansen (Asst. Prof. of Practice) and Brad Jacobson (Writing Support Specialist)

Description: In general education courses, providing constructive, purposeful writing feedback to students in a timely manner is an instructional challenge for a variety of reasons (e.g., class size, demands on time…). Incorporating peer review can support writing instruction through a student-led process of feedback and revision.

This workshop introduces general education instructors to student peer review as one strategy to provide feedback on student writing assignments. Participants will discuss strategies that help students provide useful feedback, utilize that feedback for revision, and address practical concerns about implementing student peer review into a course assignment. Participants will leave the workshop with a specific peer review design for their course.

Workshop Outcomes:

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. identify effective strategies for student peer review.
  2. develop student peer review activities that lead to focused, analytic, and specific feedback.
  3. integrate student peer review to support an interactive writing process.